What actually does the Palestinian want?

“Read our lips, how many times do we have to tell you?”

by Alan Simons

 by Alan Simons

There’s a well-known quotation by the American writer Eric Hoffer. “Passionate hatred can give meaning and purpose to an empty life.”

Among the lives of people, individuals and cultures there are many living in the Palestinian Territories who maintain that the best thing for man to strive for in this world is to take revenge on his enemies. For many young Muslim Palestinians who have been educated at an early age in their schools to hate Israel and hate Jews, the satisfaction for revenge cannot be clearer than it is today.  

The great ninth century Jewish philosopher Saadia Gaon commented that the thirst for revenge affords the pleasure of seeing discomfiture of its enemy, assuages the vehemence of its wrath and puts an end to excessive brooding. Saadia said that the man who is consumed by the desire for revenge gets into a frame of mind of refusing to accept intercession or entertaining any feeling of compassion or pity.

“Hatred brought on by illiterate Imams.”

Over one thousand years later Saadia’s comments still reflect the attitude that we have learnt nothing. As we observe the hatred in the Palestinian Territories against the Jew we find very little is based upon the acceptance that, heaven forbid, my world can also be shared in peace, equally, without reservation.

And as to its leaders, today’s Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, openly falsifies historical evidence, instills hatred in his young people’s minds towards the Israeli citizen, young and old, that I maintain no civilized democratic government has a hope in hell in stopping. It is a hatred that has its own direction, its own time and space, egged on by the perverse nature of fanatics utilizing the services of weak squabbling western-based democratic governments, of financially-strapped international media that have no time, or will, to verify the accuracy of its stories, the ten second clip, satellite dishes, mobile phones, photos of children and Internet web sites and social media outlets. It is a hatred brought on by illiterate Imams to the masses of the uneducated and their educated children.

Christopher Hitchens, the noted British born author, religious and literary critic once said: “It is a moral idiot who thinks that antisemitism is a threat only to Jews.” How right he was! Look no further than in the Middle East. Those who hate Jews also hate Christians.

“The Church is being silenced and driven out of its ancient biblical heartland.”

JIN November 2015 shutterstockEarlier this week, a bi-annual report on Christian persecution, produced by the international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need, was published. In essence, the report states:

At a time when the numbers of displaced and refugees have hit an all-time high, Islamists groups—ISIS foremost—are carrying out religiously motivated ethnic cleaning of Christians, notably in the Middle East and in parts of Africa.

In parts of the Middle East—particularly in Syria and Iraq—the crisis is so severe that barring significant interventions on the part of world powers, the Christian presence may disappear completely within a decade or even sooner. For example, there may be as few as 275,000 Christians left in Iraq, down from 1 million 12 years ago.

For Palestinian Christians, in towns such as Bethlehem, which used to be uniquely Christian, Muslims now are a clear and growing majority. As it’s been said, “The veil has replaced the cross.”

To return to Hitchens: “And the most depressing and wretched spectacle of the past decade, for all those who care about democracy and secularism, has been the degeneration of Palestinian Arab nationalism into the theocratic and thanatocratic hell of Hamas and Islamic Jihad, where the Web site of Gaza’s ruling faction blazons an endorsement of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.”

Many Jews ask me, “What actually does the Palestinian want?”

For Palestinians, the answer is simple. Time and time again, in numerous opinion polls and studies, the vast majority have said; read our lips, how many times do we have to tell you? We do not want to make peace with Israel. Yet, for some crazy implausible reason many Jews on the political left, don’t believe them. Why is it that by some twisted conclusion we wholeheartedly accept that Iran wants to annihilate Israel, yet, in our hearts and minds we have become mired in the conviction that we can help to transform a Palestinian people, indoctrinated from birth to hate and kill Jews, to live side-by-side with their Jewish neighbour?

Was it not Shakespeare who said: “In time we hate that which we often fear?” For the ordinary Palestinian perhaps we should first try to understand what they fear more than what they want.

Well, that’s my opinion!

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SEVENTY YEARS LATER -

SEVENTY YEARS LATER – “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” | “The more things change, the more they stay the same”

Thank God there’s an Israel!

بفضل الله، هناك إسرائيل

ہم اسرائیل کے پاس خدا کا شکر ہے

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FRANCE: The defence against fanaticism is a necessity.

Editorial Comment

In July 2014, at the height of the violence against the Jewish community of France, jewishinfoNews published a message by Roger Cukierman, President of CRIF, the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France. In deference to the French citizens murdered last week in the name of Allah, the Most Compassionate, the Most Merciful, we believe it appropriate to republish Cukierman’s message one more time.

The following is a translation of the original message, in French, that can be read in its entirety >here<

Roger Cukierman

Like many in France, I have family and friends who have on several occasions run into underground shelters. I think of them, as I think of the civilian population of Gaza who have been bombed for several nights. As a child hidden during the Second World War, I do not have selective compassion. And I want to believe that this is also true for the vast majority of French and especially those among us who are Jewish or Muslim.

If the facts are known, it is essential to put them into perspective. The news from the Middle East is once again having serious repercussions in France, [that included] demonstrations and assaults against two synagogues in Paris.

When one takes a step backward, one cannot but be struck by the selective indignation of the people who took to the streets to express their solidarity with the Gazans, but remained silent about the plight of Syrians, Iraqis, Libyans, Christians, Nigerians who are under the yoke of Boko Haram …

When one takes a step backward, one cannot but be struck by the inability of these people to express their support or opposition without hate or violence.

Everyone can, of course, have their opinion and belief about the policies of the Israeli government and even suffer from focusing their attention solely on Israel and obscuring [information about] other countries in the region. Anyone who has set foot in Israel, or read Israeli newspapers, knows that the political debate is everywhere and in Israel, as in France, citizens are critical of their government.

What is at stake in the protests that occurred this past weekend in France, as in the “Day of Wrath” event last January, are not part of the political debate…

Behind the corruption of solidarity, there is hate. This hatred is today against the Jews.It started against synagogues in inconceivable violence, as it evoked [to many] the darkest hours in the history of Europe during the 20th century. And hatred, which today is against the Jews, by tomorrow will be aimed at other groups [living] in our national community.

When one takes a step backward, one cannot but be struck by the rise of fanaticism and extremism. No country is immune.

In Europe, fanaticism killed in Montauban, Toulouse and Brussels. Fanaticism also killed in Oslo and in Utøya, Norway. Fanaticism could have killed elsewhere if the terrorists had not been put out of harm’s way before they acted out.

In Europe, young people are becoming fanatical and sent to the jihad in Syria, Afghanistan, Mali. Those who return to Europe are [time] bombs, bursting with hatred for all those who refuse Sharia violent totalitarianism.  They want to deprive us of our freedom…

If fanaticism is universal, it is clear that it has been successful for quite some time in some branches of Islam [especially] among the rich Middle East producers of oil and gas who generously fund murderous folly in mullahs and imams who refuse pluralism, who want to impose their way of life and who are opposed to the right of each individual to decide their lifestyle, sexuality and religion.

Democracy cannot accommodate people who hate and want to destroy those who do not think like them. It must defend itself. It is a necessity, an imperative.

This applies in France, as in Israel. This applies in all countries, including the future Palestine, where individuals’ love of humanism, justice and ethics face the fanatics.

And when these fanatics resort to rain rockets and missiles against civilian populations, one cannot put one’s faith in avant-garde technology… It is necessary and vital to defend ourselves and defend democracy. This is the State of Israel.

The fight against fanaticism, extremism and terrorism is a noble fight. This is not a war of religions, or a clash of civilizations. It is even less a war between Israelis and Palestinians, or a war between Jew and Arab. No, this is a fight for the values ​​that are the foundation of our nation: freedom, equality and fraternity. This is the condition of “living together” in a peaceful society.

* * *

SEVENTY YEARS LATER - "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" | "The more things change, the more they stay the same"

SEVENTY YEARS LATER – “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” | “The more things change, the more they stay the same”

Thank God there’s an Israel!

بفضل الله، هناك إسرائيل

ہم اسرائیل کے پاس خدا کا شکر ہے

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A message to our brothers and sisters in France. We are one!

But in Pakistan, in Afghanistan and in Luton, England, they celebrate the killings!

“Today, French Jews feel like outcasts of the nation. We must now protect Jewish schools and synagogues to avoid attacks, Jews can not go out with a yarmulke, especially in the metro. The pro-Palestinian demonstrations in the month of July [2014] was a terrible warning, with attacks on places of worship and slogans such as “Death to the Jews!” Heard in the streets of France. It’s scary. Added to this, a feeling of constant danger with the French who go do jihad and can return to France with the will to carry out attacks, like Mohamed Merah in Toulouse and Mehdi Nemmouche in Brussels. We are facing an Islamist threat that hangs over all of France. This global climate scares French Jews. It is a failure for France, where a population is suffering persecution because of his origins.”

-Roger Cukierman, President of the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France.…………..  (Le Figaro, January 2, 2015) 

by Alan Simons

by Alan Simons

As reported this past week, according to the Jewish Agency for Israel, more than 7,000 Jews from France emigrated to Israel in 2014, more than double the previous year’s total of 3,293 citizens. It was the largest contingent from any country. Sadly, the flow is expected to continue throughout 2015. I suspect it won’t stop there and especially won’t within France’s young, vibrant Jewish community. To date, thousands of them have left France to established a new life in the USA, Canada, Australia and of course in Israel.

About seven years ago while I was in Paris, a dear Jewish friend of mine, who was born in Algeria, invited me to join her at a lunch given at a Jewish community centre. I was struck by the utter pessimism pervading in many of those present. Be they originally from Tunisia, Algeria or born in metropolitan France, as I went around introducing myself, parents told me that their children had already left the country. Seven years ago. And now as I read and watch what is happening in France, I wonder if those same parents I spoke to have joined their children for a better and safer environment.

I think of myself as a somewhat optimistic and strong individual. For I probably see the good in people more than the darker side of people’s personality, irrespective of their race and religion. But, if I was currently living in France as a Jew, I really wonder if I would be able to maintain my optimism. Honestly, I doubt it.

Today, Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 3 pm, a silent solidarity march in Paris and in other major French centres, will bring together a multitude of world leaders.  From Italy, Russia, Germany, Britain, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Latvia, Ukraine, Turkey, Israel and Italy. From Arab and African nations, they will all march to show their distaste to the barbaric acts committed by Islamist terrorists who have now taken over the role Hitler and other despots attempted to achieve.

Today, France will prove to us once again that as a proud country of culture, history and great beauty, if there’s one thing they’re good at, it is putting on a superb solidarity march.

So many of its citizens, Muslim, Jew and Christian were killed this past week. So many of its Jewish citizens, over the past number of years, children and adults alike, have been murdered in the name of Allah, the Most Compassionate, the Most Merciful. 

As we read and watch these sickening events continually take place in France, what do I, as a Canadian, have to offer my brothers and sisters living in France. Is it hope? Hope is the expectation that circumstances in the future will get better. Will it? I really wonder if it will.

There is documented evidence to suggest that there has been a Jewish presence in the south of France since at least the 1st century.  If the Islamist terrorists have their way that presence, in the years ahead, will surely come to an end. And so will the France as we know it. Perhaps it already has.

Thank God there’s an Israel.

(Photo credit: RT YouTube)

* * *

SEVENTY YEARS LATER - "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" | "The more things change, the more they stay the same"

SEVENTY YEARS LATER – “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” | “The more things change, the more they stay the same”

Thank God there’s an Israel!

بفضل الله، هناك إسرائيل

ہم اسرائیل کے پاس خدا کا شکر ہے

 Check out all of our latest jewishinfoNews videos

 الأخباراليهودية.شبكة

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